How I See It – 25 days

From time to time I post observations relating to our move back to the US after 12 years in Ireland. From the culture to ourselves, many many things seem different. This is my take on it. Views and observations are my own and only my own. They are simply observations and musings, not facts or absolutes to any one place or environment.

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So many ways to say the same thing. It gets confusing sometimes.

  1. I’m seriously considering carrying a flask with me. A flask of milk. A flask of milk for my tea.
  2. When I ask for “tea” here they assume it’s iced tea unless specified, “Hot Tea.”
  3. It’s possible we stand too close to people in lines.
  4. People seem to need a lot more personal space to pass each other in aisles. I’ll be standing there and someone will be waiting for me to move so they can get by while I’m thinking that two additional people could get by with all that space there.
  5. While in a car waiting to pick up kids from school, people leave loads more space between cars here. I have to stay calm and not get stressed about all that wasted space. We were always in need of more space in Ireland. Always. But not here. There is a lot of space. I still can’t help myself from saying, “Stop wasting all that space!” It’s a good thing my car windows are rolled up or they would be like, “Who’s that weird lady yelling about space over there?” But thankfully, they probably wouldn’t hear me because of all the space between our cars. 
  6. I must remember to smile back when random people smile at me. 
  7. People seem so outwardly friendly. I’m not used to that outgoing nature. 
  8. There are so many different words here that sometimes I can’t talk and people look at me funny. Whoever said, “It’s so good you get to speak English in Ireland” like it’s the same thing, needs to know, it’s not the same English. No joke. *
  9. Where we are located,  it doesn’t seem like people are used to dealing with people who are unfamiliar with how to do things in America. Please be patient with me.
  10. I heard a foreign accent the other day and immediately felt at home and wanted to be friends with them. 
  11. I am tired. Learning a new place and relearning my birth culture (if you can call moving to a new, and very different, region 12 years later relearning. Not so sure about that.) is exhausting. Time for some sleep.
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Nothin’ like a proper cuppa.

 

*The Irish predominantly speak a dialect of English known as Hiberno English.

I Come From the Future…And the Past

So….

I moved…

Across an Ocean…

But it feels like 17 oceans…

Like I am coming from the future…

Back to the past…

But also…

From the past into the future…

Confusing?

I agree!

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Ireland

Three months ago we moved to the US after living in Ireland 12 years. We not only left our adopted country and home, but we moved to a place where started out knowing only one person which we had only met once 15 years ago for two hours.  One. Single. Person.

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Ireland

So we moved to a new country, a new region in that country, a new home in that region, new schools, a new job. It’s all new. Nothing is the same. At first glance Ireland and the US do not seem that different but, they are. They really are. And considering the culture shock for me, imagine the shock for my 11 & 12 year old boys. Their whole lives they have been told they are American. Well, here in America, now they are Irish. It’s the plight of the TCK (Third Culture Kid). You are seen as being “more so” from the country in which you are NOT currently present in. Never fully one or the other.

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Green in Ireland, White in USA

Sure, we took several short trips over the years. We even spent two, four month stints in the US when they were little kiddos.  But trips never cut it in terms of cultural awareness when you move to the place you’ve only ever visited. The didn’t come “home” to America. They are effectively foreigners. And mostly invisible ones. Even the language, though both English, is different enough (Hiberno English and American English are different dialects) that they struggle to understand at times. We all do actually. And the slang? Let’s put that on hold for a while can we?

All this to say,

I’m going to attempt to be writing about this for a while, still interspersing creativity and art and other beautiful things. But for now, adapting to a place that is simultaneously home and a foreign land, and all the observations and crazy stories and misunderstandings and funny happenings that come with it is going to be the hot topic around here for a while.

There is a small window of time after being away from your home country that you get to see things more objectively than we otherwise are able. I hope to capture these moments and note them here. Partly for me, so I can remember, because time passes quickly and it’s easy to forget. And partly, I hope, for you.

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A New View: Flat, Wide Open Countryside

So whether you are an outsider looking in (which we all are to some extent) or insider looking out, her we go. One particular perspective after living between two particular countries.  I find things like this particularly interesting. I hope you do too.

 

*All photos were taken by me. Copywrited. Do not use without permission.

Illumination – Weekly Photo Challenge

I’m so happy to be back on the Weekly Photo Challenge this week.

Illumination is the focus this week. I really like how Cheri mentioned their interest in abstract and creative interpretations. That basically sums up what I aim to communicate on these challenges, and on this blog as well.

These were taken on the train recently. It was a very foggy, wet day outside and the windows of the train were fogged up inside. It made for some stunning views.

Tree Echoes Through Rain

Tree Echoes Through Rain

Light Echoes Through Trees

Light Echoes Through Trees

And one more from an opposite kind of day…

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Peace out.

The Landfill Harmonic

Usually when someone asks me, “Hey, did you see that video online…” my answer is, No. The Landfill Harmonic trailer is a different story. Literally.

You don’t have to visit here long to know we’re ALL about beautiful things. Even more so when they have come from unexpected places. This is the epitome of all these things. It’s One Beautiful Thing‘s heart in music and so much more.

See for yourself. It’s three minutes that still have my heartstrings an hour later. I suspect it will for a long time.

Believe

I believe in beginnings.

I believe in love,

I believe in hate,

I believe in satisfaction,

I believe in greed,

I believe in light,

I believe in darkness,

I believe in more,

I believe in less,

I believe in beauty,

I believe in ugliness,

I believe in hope,

I believe in destruction,

I believe in dreams,

I believe in failures,

I believe in rest,

I believe in turmoil,

I believe in life,

I believe in death,

I believe in truth,

I believe in lies,

I believe in fullness,

I believe in loss,

I believe in best effort,

I believe in deceit,

I believe in heat,

I believe in coldness,

I believe in more,

I believe in less,

I believe in endings.

-Stacey Covell